8 Things You Need To Make Sure Your Personal Website Wows Potential Employers

What looks cooler than having a business card with “yourname.com” at the bottom? (The actual yourname.com site is terrible, but you get the picture). Want a place to show everyone you are more than your academic qualifications, and the volunteering you did aged 16? This guide is a list of all the things you need to build a personal website that shows off your personality to anyone who might think about hiring you.

1- High Res Photos of You

High resolution photographs of you is a must for your personal website. High quality doesn’t mean you need to hire a photographer, or get professional headshots (although you may decide to do this).

However, it doesn’t look great if the photo that you choose to represent yourself to the world, has the hand of your clubbing buddy, poorly cropped out of the frame, and you’re standing underneath a sign advertising ‘3 Jagers for £10’ (partially because it’s not even that good of a deal).

This is your chance to express yourself, and the quality of your images will speak volumes to a potential employer about what you value and your attention to detail.

2- Your Story

You’ve seen the ‘About’ page on company sites? A lot of time and thought goes into them, and they’re often the second highest visited page on a website after the homepage.

This is because people are nosey curious about the who – who is this person? What is their origin story? What has lead them to creating this website?

If the idea of making an ‘About’ page for your personal website is a bit nauseating, why not create a ‘Who Am I?’ page, or even a ‘Why Am I Doing This?’ page?

What is it that makes you different from everyone else who shares your degree and hobbies? This is your chance to showcase your individuality and identity.

The more creativity and personality your site exudes, the better.

3- Your Portfolio

If you have a body of work, share it with the world. Even if you’re just starting out and it seems a bit undernourished, people love to see examples that you’re actually doing stuff.

How can you show somebody that you’re a doer? Show them anything and everything.

Whether it be a piece of university coursework you are especially proud of, a screenshot of the website you set up to help your mum flog her 2nd hand puppet collection (we don’t judge), or an article you published in the student newspaper- the more you can do to show people that you have done productive things, the better.

4- Real Life Experience

So, you haven’t had a series of corporate internships (or maybe you have, I don’t know you), but you’ve spent the past few summers travelling through Africa and it’s changed you more than you could have imagined.

Even if you haven’t got ‘work’ experience to speak of, you will definitely have ‘life’ experience that has made you into the person you are today.

Perhaps you grew up abroad and you have a natural ability to connect with people of all languages and cultures, or personal circumstances meant that you grew up fending for yourself and becoming more resourceful as a result – anything that makes you YOU is real life experience, and is part of your story.

5- Video

A short video of you on your site can go a long way to communicating who you are. Potential employers love to see a little snippet of potential candidates in action, so a short video detailing a little bit about yourself can be a highly effective way to talk directly to the people you want to talk to.

Want to get creative? Why not create a page called “Calling All Startups!”and upload your message to anybody on the lookout for their next team member?

This is especially relevant for people who want to break into the media world.

6- Contact Email

Ok, this seems obvious, but make sure you have a way for people to get in touch with you. A ‘Contact’ address at the bottom of your page is usually enough, or even a dedicated page (if you are feeling decadent). You would be surprised how many people forget this.

7- Links To Social Media

Be sure to link up all your social media accounts to your website so visitors can travel between them all.

If you have things on social media that you wouldn’t want your future boss to see, then it is probably worth being more selective about what you put on the internet in the first place.

It might finally be time to untag yourself from the photo taken on that (not so) memorable night that you decided to take an impromptu nap on the street in Magaluf ‘12.

8- Blog

‘How to perfect the personal blog’ could fill it’s own article (and probably will do in the not too distant future), but the basic premise is quite simple.

Maintaining a blog demonstrates perseverance, while simultaneously showing off your tone of voice.

If you can set aside time every day/week to create something, then you are showing your organisation and time management skills, which is infinitely better than telling them that on your CV.

Well, that’s it from me folks. If you enjoyed reading, please subscribe to the blog for all the latest updates, and leave comments/share the love.

If you didn’t enjoy it, you can always subscribe and share ‘ironically’.

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This article was adapted from an extract of TalentRocket’s ‘The Startup Graduate

The Ultimate Guide To Launching Your Startup Career (Even If You Have No Experience…Yet)’ by Will Reynolds, which is free to download.

 

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